This week I have been reading about marketing in the ‘digital age’. I have discovered that many organisations are finding it difficult to connect with consumers, as overbearing advertisements are having a significant impact on consumer behaviour. It is becoming increasingly challenging to engage with consumers that are starting to avoid these ‘annoying’ adverts.

The looming problem for professional marketers is the ease through which consumers can find ways to avoid these kind of adverts altogether. A report issued by PageFair and Adobe Ad Blocking in 2015 highlighted that 198 million people worldwide use some form of adblocker. Compounding this issue, consumers are now using multiple devices to access the Internet, which makes them almost invisible to advertisers. In fact, around 25% of people in the UK confess to use 3 or more devices a day, in what has been termed the new ‘multi-screen reality’.

Another issue is that advertising has become disruptive for television viewing as well as online browsing. There are many ways in which consumers can bypass adverts all together such as using the fast-forward button on a Sky remote. Alternatively, people are choosing not to engage in watching adverts because they are distracted by their smartphone. Research by Accenture (2015) found that 87% of consumers use more than one device at a time, most commonly watching television and browsing on a smartphone.

Consumers are also using their televisions and other digital devices to stream online content. On-demand services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime offer the service of unlimited, and almost uninterrupted content for a low monthly fee.

So with all of this in mind, I then thought - what can we do as prospective digital marketers to combat the problem of creating a disruptive browsing experience, to ensure the future of digital advertising?

The good news is that it is something that we are already beginning to see today, with some organisations embracing new initiatives such as real-time marketing.

Two possible real-time marketing solutions are ‘native advertising’ and ‘moment marketing’.

A preference for native advertising has been found amongst consumers. The promotion of a product or a service is situated within the flow of the scheduled content, therefore being less disruptive for the consumer experience.

An example of a native ad is the New York Times 1500-word article about women inmates that was published online to promote the Netflix series Orange is the New Black. This article was successful because it appealed to a particular audience, offering them an interesting topic whilst advertising a way for them to explore it further by watching the series online. The article was particularly engaging as it included audio clips, a slideshow and graphics which moved when the reader scrolled down the page.

An alternative solution is ‘moment marketing’. An important thing to acknowledge is that people today live their lives in moments, which we must identify and capitalise on in order to stay up-to-date and relevant to the modern day consumer.

Through their best-selling chocolate bar KitKat, Nestlé have changed their marketing strategy to attract the modern consumer. They chose to invest in the KitKat brand to become more relevant and engaging to consumers.

For the many years that it has been around, KitKat has been synonymous with ‘taking a break’. However, the ways in which people take breaks has changed over time. So, as part of this change in strategy, Nestlé redesigned KitkKat packets to mirror the different ways people spend their breaks such as ‘YouTube my break’ which involved a link to a short YouTube video that people could watch. This interactive approach is a great example of ‘moment marketing’ because it is engaging for the consumer and is consistent with the tagline of their brand which has been the same for 80 years.

To conclude, what is key, for those of us who are aspiring digital marketers, is to make it personal by remaining people-focused, putting the consumer at the centre of everything that we do. A key part of facilitating this is staying up-to-date and relevant with consumers, responding in real-time to changes in their behaviour.